Latest News

Ordinations within the Triratna Order take place throughout the year and world: the UK, Spain, India, Australia, New Zealand and the US, all have ordinations taking place regularly. This section lists who’s been ordained recently, where they’ve been ordained, and what their new name means.

The College consists of forty two members, with retirements and new appointments on an annual basis. When a new member joins the College, we’ll introduce them here. The recent Letter by the Chair, which is written for the College Newsletter, will be included as well, as is a link to our Blog page on the Buddhist Centre Online.

RECENT ORDINATIONS

The College is delighted to announce that the following men and women have been ordained:

The following men had their Public ordinations on 20th October 2019, at the Hsuan Tsang Retreat Centre, Bordharan, India.

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Public Preceptor: Adityabodhi                                                                                                                

1. Aurn Baburaoji Ingale from Amaravati becomes Vishuddhavacha

Private preceptor: Nagaketu

2. Dilip P. Khadase from Akola becomes Kripaveer

Private preceptor: Lokanath

3. Vinod Mahadevrao Thamake from Wardha becomes Dhirchitta

Private preceptor: Lokanath  

4. Bhimrao Gulab Gade from Pune becomes Dharmaprabha

Private preceptor : Surangam

5. Raju Aba Chandanshive from Pimpri Pune becomes Kushalabandhu

Private preceptor: Surangam

6. Bhagvan Kisan Jondhale from Nanded becomes Samantachakshu

Private preceptor: Chandrabodhi

7. Vishvanath Limbaji Kamble from Pimpri Pune becomes Maitrichandra Private preceptor: Chandrabodhi

8. Kishor Sukhadevrao Maitriveer from Amaravati becomes Sugatananda. Private preceptor: Chandrabodhi

9. Bhalachandra Tambe from Khed becomes Amoghasen

Private preceptor: Yashosagar

Public Preceptor Amrutdeep                                                                                                            

10. Gautam Sukhadas Borkar from Nagpur becomes Pramodaditya

Private preceptor: Amrutdeep 

11. Sandeep J. Rakshit from Amaravati becomes Ratnaraj

Private preceptor: Amrutdeep 

12. Divyanshu Boudh from Nagpur becomes Kshantiprabha

Private preceptor : Amrutdeep

13. Milind Devidas Patil from Amaravati becomes Sucikirti

Private preceptor: Amrutdeep 

14. Vishnupant Kedar from Amaravati becomes Anshulbodhi

Private preceptor: Ratnasiddhi

15. Santapal from Delhi becomes Anshulraja

Private preceptor: Ratnasiddhi 

16. Deepak Tayde from Amaravati becomes Anshulvajra

Private preceptor: Ratnasiddhi 

17. Harendra Kumar from Bordharan becomes Anshulratna

Private preceptor: Ratnasiddhi 

18. Raghunath Nandeshver from Nagpur becomes Buddhadatta

Private preceptor: Nagaketu     

19. Gangadhar Shamraoji Sonone from  Amaravati becomes Kulanishtha. Private preceptor: Nagaketu

20. Prabhakar Daulat Walke from Nagpur becomes Kulachandra

Private preceptor: Nagaketu

21. Krushnarao B. Khobragade from Amaravati becomes Nirajbodhi

Private preceptor: Lokanath

22. Pitambar Ramchandra Gajbhiye from Nagpur becomes Lalitmitra

Private preceptor: Lokanath     

 

23. Bhimrao Gunaji Wankhede from Nagpur becomes Bodhikiran

Private preceptor: Maitreyasagar    

Public Preceptor Yashogar                                                                                                                         

24. Rahul Pandurang Bhaisare from Bordharan becomes Akshobhyamati. Private preceptor: Amrutdeep

25. Sachin Madhukar Pudke from Bordharan becomes Sanghakumar

Private preceptor: Amrutdeep 

26. Shankarlal from Kanpur becomes Anshulsiddhi

Private preceptor: Ratnasiddhi 

27. Ramesh Sahebrao Dhaotre from Pimpri Pune becomes Prabodhsen. Private preceptor:Surangam   

28. Rajesh Bhimrao Bhange from Nagpur becomes Yashosiddhi

Private preceptor: Maitreyasagar      

29. Dilip Namdev Gajbhar from Dapodi Pune becomes Amritketu

Private preceptor: Jnanadhvaja

30. Kumar Devidas Kamble Yerwada Pune becomes Vinayaditya

Private preceptor: Adityabodhi

Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu!

The following women had their Public ordinations on 20th October 2019, at the Buddhist Centre in Mexico City.

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Paula Michelangelli se ha convertido en Abhayasara, nombre Sánscrito cuyo significado es: ‘Ella cuya naturaleza es la valentía (de Amoghasiddhi)’. 

Paula Michelangelli becomes Abhayasara, a Sanskrit name meaning ‘She whose nature is fearlessness.’ (long 3rd and 4th ‘a’s)

Anglicized spelling: Abhayasara.

Private preceptor Jnanadakini, Public preceptor Parami.

Chela Huerta se ha convertido en Vidyavani, nombre Sánscrito cuyo significado es: ‘Ella que está en el Río de la Sabiduría.’

Chela Huerta becomes Vidyavani, a Sanskrit name meaning ‘She who is in the River of Wisdom.’ (long 1st ‘a’)

Anglicized spelling: Vidyavani.

Private preceptor Jnanadakini, Public preceptor Parami.

Lupita Honda se ha convertido en Dhammasukhini, un nombre Pali cuyo significado es ‘Aquella que es feliz siguiendo el Dhamma.’

Lupita Honda becomes Dhammasukhini, a Pali name meaning ‘She who is happy following the Dhamma.’ (long final ‘i’)

Anglicized spelling: Dhammasukhini.

Private preceptor Dayachandra, Public preceptor Parami.

Elsa Cobos se ha convertido en Suryatara, un nombre Sánscrito cuyo significado es: ‘La que es radiante como el sol.’

Elsa Cobos becomes Suryatara, a Sanskrit name meaning ‘She who is radiant like the sun.’ (long 2nd and 3rd ‘a’)

Anglicized spelling: Suryatara

Private preceptor Dayachandra, Public preceptor Parami

Jo Wace becomes Khasanti, a Pali name meaning ‘She who finds peace in the open sky.’ 

Anglicized spelling: Khasanti

Private preceptor Taraprabha, Public preceptor Karunadevi

Gail Yahwak becomes Subhramani, a Sanskrit name meaning ‘She who has a radiant jewel.’ (acute accent above the ’s’, dot under the ’n’ and long ‘i’)

Anglicized spelling: Shubhramani.

Private preceptor Amala, Public preceptor Sanghadevi.

The following women had their Public ordinations on 29th September 2019, at Golden Bay, New Zealand.

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Public Preceptor Varadevi

Judy Gray becomes Padmapuspa (dot under the ‘s’, long final ‘a’), a Sanskrit name meaning “(She who is like) a lotus flower”.
Anglicised spelling: Padmapushpa 
Malini was her Private Preceptor.

Ainslie Hannan becomes Sraddhanaya (accent over the ‘S’, long last three ’a’s), a Sanskrit name meaning “She who guides to faith”. 
Anglicized spelling: Shraddhanaya
Megha was her Private Preceptor.

Kate Ewing becomes Maitrikirti (long second and third ‘i’), a Sanskrit name meaning “She who is renowned for her love”. 
Vajrajyoti was her Private Preceptor.

Public Preceptor Malini 

Maree Beverland becomes Suvarnadhi (long last ‘i’), a Sanskrit name meaning “She whose wisdom is like gold”. 
Malini was her Private Preceptor and Vidyamala was the Giver of the Name.

Prue Treadwell becomes Prasantacitta (accent over the ‘S’, long second and last ‘a’), a Sanskrit/Pali name meaning “She whose heart is calm”.
Anglicized spelling: Prashantachitta.
Varadevi was her Private Preceptor.

Kirsten Gracie becomes Priyada (long last ‘a’), a Sanskrit name meaning “She who gives love and kindness”.
Chittaprabha was her Private Preceptor.

Public Preceptor Vajrajyoti

Helen Clack becomes Vajrasarasi (long last ‘i’), a Sanskrit name meaning “She who is like a vajra and a lake”.
Akampiya was her Private Preceptor.

Public Preceptor Megha

Sam Sammut becomes Sraddhanita (accent over the ‘S’, long second and last ‘a’), a Sanskrit/Pali name meaning “She who is guided by faith”.
Anglicized spelling: Shraddhanita.
Varadevi was her Private Preceptor.

With metta and much rejoicing,
Vajrajyoti

The following men had their Public ordinations on 24th September 2019, at Guhyaloka, Spain.

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Public Preceptor Mahamati

Paul King becomes Viryamati, a Sanskrit name meaning “He who has energy and resolve”
Private preceptor: Swadipa

Gary Murray becomes Aryasara, a Sanskrit name meaning “He whose nature is noble”
Private preceptor: Srikirti

Frederic Rosset becomes Pavaka, a Sanskrit name meaning “He who is pure, bright, shining (like a fire)”
Private preceptor: Lokesvara

Steve Howe becomes Sanghamuni, a Sanksrit name meaning “Sage of the community”
Private preceptor: Khemadhamma 

Public Preceptor Arthapriya

Mark Melbourne becomes Jyotida, a Sanskrit name meaning “Giver of light”
Private preceptor: Paraga

David Tyfield becomes Ketumati, a Sanskrit name meaning “He who has a mind like a comet”
Private preceptor: Buddhashanti

Paul Mason becomes Prajnavaca, a Sanskrit name meaning “He who has the voice of wisdom”
Private preceptor: Pramudita

Ian Hannah becomes Ajitamati, a Sankrit name meaning “He who has a mind which is unconquered”
Private preceptor: Buddhashanti

Sion Williams becomes Amita, a Sanskrit/Pali name meaning “Unbounded”
Private preceptor: Tejananda

Billy Frugal becomes Nagakushala, a Sanskrit name meaning “He who has the skilfulness of the nagas”
Private preceptor: Samanartha

Will Elworthy becomes Kamalavajra, a Sanskrit name meaning “Lotus vajra”
Private preceptor: Paraga

Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu!

The following women had their Public ordinations on 1st June 2019 at Akashavana, Spain.

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Public Preceptor Parami

Lynne Thompson Campbell becomes Dhicitraka, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who paints wisdom” (long first ‘i’, long last ‘a’).
Westernised spelling Dhichitraka.
Private Preceptor Amritamati.

Ania Markiewiecz becomes Saddhajala, a Pali name meaning “Flame of Faith” (long second, third and fourth ‘a’s).
Westernised spelling Saddhajala.
Private Preceptor Saddhanandi.

Gerry Beasley becomes Danabhaya, a Sanskrit / Pali name meaning “She whose generosity makes her fearless” (long first, second and last ‘a’s)
Westernised spelling Danabhaya.
Private Preceptor Sridakini.

Margo Winning becomes Satyavandana, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who reveres the truth”. (long final ‘a’)
Westernised spelling Satyavandana.
Private Preceptor Gunasiddhi.

Hanka Dilley becomes Prajñanita, a Sanskrit / Pali name meaning “She who is led by wisdom”. (tilde above the ’n’, long second and final ‘a’s and long ‘i’).
Westernised spelling Prajnanita.
Private Preceptor Saddhanandi.

Public Preceptor Santavajri

Marjolijn Stoltenkamp becomes Mañjudhi, a Sanskrit name meaning “Gentle wisdom”. (tilde above the ’n’ and long ‘i’)
Westernised spelling Manjudhi.
Private Preceptor Akashasuri.

Hannah Leonie Prinzler becomes Simharava, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who has a lion’s roar”. (dot under the ‘m’ and long second and third ‘a’s)
Westernised spelling Simharava.
Private Preceptor Parami.

Public Preceptor Maitreyi

Sarah Nixon becomes Moksadhi, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who has the wisdom of liberation”. (dot under the ’s’and long ‘i’).
Westernised spelling Mokshadhi.
Private Preceptor Parami.

Meg Hughes becomes Maitrisamudra, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who is an ocean of loving kindness”. (long second ‘i’ and long final ‘a’)
Westernised spelling Maitrisamudra.
Private Preceptor Santavajri.

Rosemarie Kosche becomes Acaladhi, a Sanskrit name meaning “she whose wisdom is unwavering” (long final ‘i’).
Private Preceptor Taracitta.

Jayne Osgood becomes Kalyani, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who is noble and authentic”. (long second’a’, dot under the ’n’ and long ‘i’)
Westernised spelling Kalyani.
Private Preceptor Varasahaya.

Alex Suffolk becomes Akasanandi, a Sanskrit name meaning “She whose delight is in infinite space”. (long first and second ‘a’s, acute accent above the ’s’ and long ‘i’)
Westernised spelling Akashanandi.
Private Preceptor Sraddhamayi. 

Public Preceptor Punyamala

Ruth Rudd becomes Tarajyoti, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who is or has the light of Tara”. (long ‘a’s).
Westernised spelling Tarajyoti.
Private Preceptor Karunacitta.

Andrea Würdinger becomes Viryapadma, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who is a lotus of energy”. (long ‘i’ and long last ‘a’).
Westernised spelling Viryapadma.
Private Preceptor Kalyanaprabha.

Jan Osborne becomes Anantamati, a Sanskrit name meaning “She who has a boundless or infinite mind or intelligence; she who has a sky-like mind”.
Westernised spelling Anantamati.
Private Preceptor Sagaraghosa.

Siobhan Ford becomes Padmasakhi, a Pali name meaning “Lotus friend”. (long ‘i’).
Westernised spelling Padmasakhi.
Private  Preceptor Ratnavandana.

The following Public ordination ceremony was held on 15th May 2019, at Dharmadhara Retreat Center, USA

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Ex- Dan Roberts, seen here on the right, becomes Karunashanti.  His new name means “He whose peace is through or from compassion.”

Shantinayaka, seen here on the left, was Private Preceptor and Viradhamma was Public Preceptor.

NEW COLLEGE MEMBERS

The College is delighted to announce that the following have recently become members of the College.

Vajrashura

Dublin, Ireland

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I first came across Triratna (then the FWBO) in Dublin, Ireland, in 1999, at the age of 22. After being convinced by a friend, I learned meditation from Ratnabandhu of the Dublin Meditation Centre and really enjoyed it. A little while later I realised I was a Buddhist, and that without some deeper meaning in my life I would continue to live existentially adrift and feel unfulfilled. I was particularly struck by the clarity of Bhante’s expression of the Dharma. I was finishing my studies in Theoretical Physics in Trinity College Dublin, but decided to leave my Ph.D. unfinished and look for something more meaningful.

In 2002, I had a very significant time participating in a Karuā door-knocking appeal in London, and once back in Dublin I became a Mitra and asked for ordination, started working for the Dublin Buddhist Centre as Centre Manager, and moved into a new men’s residential community.

I very much enjoyed the ordination process and was ordained in 2007 in Guhyaloka, my Private Preceptor being Kulananda and my Public Preceptor being Saddhaloka.

In 2009, I became the Men’s Mitra Convenor for Dublin, a role I have loved doing and still do to this day. It’s a very pure experience of being able to help people to connect with and grow in the Dharma, and the friendships that are formed are meaningful indeed. In 2018, I became a Private Preceptor, and I continue to work closely with the ordination team in Padmaloka to help men in Ireland prepare for ordination.

I recently started working for the Sikkha Project on a part-time basis. I still live in a men’s community and enjoy that very much. I am happy to be part of the College so that I can support the continued development and growth of the Triratna Sangha, particularly in Ireland.

Nagapriya 

Cuernavaca, Mexico

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I first met Triratna in Leeds, England in 1988.  I was studying for a degree in philosophy and was, so it seems now, searching for the meaning of life. I quickly realized that I had found my spiritual home and, after moving to Manchester, I was ordained in 1992. I worked for some years at the Manchester Buddhist Centre and then at Dharmavastu Study Centre.

After a period of academic study and work, I moved to Mexico in 2013 and, somewhat inadvertently, co-founded Centro Budista de Cuernavaca of which I am current and founding Chair. I also ended up as the director of Editorial Dharmamegha, a project dedicated to publishing Sangharakshita´s and other Triratna works in Spanish. I got involved in the men´s ordination process in Latin America shortly after arriving in Mexico and form part of the ordination team.

There is huge potential for Triratna in Latin America and I feel privileged to be able to contribute to this process in some small way. Mexico particularly seems a receptive field for the Dharma and our sangha here is growing rapidly.

My published works include: Exploring Karma and Rebirth (Windhorse, 2003), Visions of Mahayana Buddhism (Windhorse, 2009), and The Buddhist Way (New Holland, 2018).

Virasiddhi

Mexico City, Mexico

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I encountered the Dharma in 1995 at Mexico City, thanks to the work of Upekshamati. Meditation and the Dharma openend fresh and new possibilities for my life. In summer 1997 for the first time in my life I traveled to a foreign country, I visited Cambridge, UK and had the opportunity to have some experience in community living and right livelihood at Windhorse Trading and a retreat at Padmaloka. At the end of 1997, I received a letter from Keturaja inviting me to join Windhorse, so I decided to quit my job to have a full inmersion experience in the spiritual life. 

From 1998 to 2004 I lived in a community and practiced right livelihood at Windhorse and trained for ordination; this really was very important and beneficial to my spiritual life. I got ordained in 2003. After this time at Windhorse it was clear to me I wanted to contribute to Triratna in my home country.  So in 2004, I went back to Mexico with the intention to support Upekshamati´s work at the Mexico City Buddhist Centre. I have been working for the Buddhist Centre in Mexico City for the past 15 years as manager, mitra convenor, facilitating introduction to Buddhism courses and Dharma study. I am also part of the Council.

I am also involved in the Mexican Ordination team with Moksananda, Samamati and Nagapriya. I became a Private Preceptor in 2013. During October 2018 was at Adhisthana as a participant in the International Course, this was a great experience to connect with Order members from different parts of the world and a learning opportunity. Unfortunately Bhate died that month. His death was a catalyst to make my mind about entering the consultation process to become a Public Preceptor.

This new responsibility as a Public Preceptor is a way for me to support Moksananda´s work in the Spanish speaking world, sharing the responsibility for the Ordination process and contribute with my grain of sand to Triratna’s future after Bhante´s death.

At present I live with my partner Satyasuri, a cousin and another friend from the sangha.

OBITUARIES

Remembering former College Members who have died in recent years.

Dharmacharini Anagarika Ratnasuri

1 April 1923 – 13 September 2019

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Ratnasuri was born on 1 April 1923, in Norwich, one of triplets. She and one sister survived – after a difficult start; they were so small they had to be fed by their parents with a dropper from a fountain pen. They joined a family that included a brother and another sister. Their father was a tailor. He made the family’s clothes and they were always smartly dressed. Having such a talented father is perhaps where Ratnasuri’s love of art and design started. At thirteen, she went to junior art school and enjoyed drawing, painting, dress design and poster design. At sixteen, she did an apprenticeship as a window dresser in a very smart Norwich department store, but any dreams of progression were abruptly halted by the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939. In 1942, at nineteen, she decided to join the war effort. She said later, “I really wanted to defeat Hitler!” Her boss at the department store was furious, but Ratnasuri had bigger concerns.

All who experienced the war witnessed the fragility of life, but perhaps especially those who saw conflict directly. Ratnasuri worked in the anti-aircraft battery guiding the guns and the men firing them. One night in Antwerp, after a frightening overhead air-raid, she set off to meet a boyfriend and found out he had been killed in a direct hit.

Ratnasuri was already looking for some deeper meaning to her life, but like many women she ended up getting married and settling down. Her marriage wasn’t a happy one, but she did have two sons, Kevin and Peter, who she loved and cherished. She found employment doing quality control in a chocolate factory and as a lab technician for the Milk Marketing Board. The years passed and the children grew up.

In her mid-fifties, having left home, Ratnasuri took up yoga with Sona. Through him she started to read books about Buddhism. She also came across the magazine Mitrata, which was produced in Norwich by Srimala. Ratnasuri started attending classes at the Norwich Buddhist Centre. Typically, she threw herself into the sangha with youthful verve, even though, being in her fifties, she was regarded as ‘old’ by younger members. Eventually she was going to every class the centre offered! She worked with Aloka and other Order Members in the wholefood café, Rainbow, latterly Oranges. She had been involved for two years when she became a mitra. It was five years after first coming along to the Norwich Centre when, in 1983, she was ordained, alongside Ratnavandana and Ratnadakini. She was given the name Ratnasuri, which means ‘Heroine of the Three Jewels’. At sixty, most people are thinking about retirement. Ratnasuri was just getting started!

After ordination, she lived and worked around the Croydon Buddhist Centre for a year. Then, in 1983, the women members of the Western Buddhist Order decided to hold a month-long intensive retreat on the Isle of Muck. There were just twenty women Order members at the time and they joked on the journey that if the ferry went down on the way to Muck, that would be it for the women’s wing of the Order! Fortunately, it didn’t. On the retreat Sanghadevi announced that she wanted to set up the FWBO’s first women’s retreat centre and wanted someone to go with her. Guess who put up their hand and volunteered?

So at sixty-two years old, Ratnasuri found herself going down the long, bumpy track to Cornhill Farm, Shropshire, now known as Taraloka. There were four women who were the founder members of the Taraloka community: Sanghadevi and Ratnasuri and the mitras who would become Karunasri and Kulanandi. The fifth member was Ratnasuri’s cat, Tansy. It wasn’t easy; they were pioneers, and pioneers in boiler suits and hard hats as well, having to undertake much of the restoration work on the old farm themselves. Ratnasuri cooked valiantly for everyone on a camping gas stove, frequently with bits of ceiling falling in the food! She also co-led many of the meditation retreats with Sanghadevi.

Not long after moving to Taraloka, Ratnasuri became an ‘anagarika’. This meant following the example of the Buddha by committing oneself to a simple life where one does not pick and choose; and also taking vows of celibacy. At her ceremony she wore the orange robes that symbolically connect with the Buddha and his early followers, a tradition stretching back over 2,500 years.

But Ratnasuri’s heroism didn’t stop there. In 1987, while on retreat at Taraloka, Ratnasuri received a phone call from Srimala. She told her that Sangharakshita’s mother was ill so he couldn’t go to India to conduct ordinations as planned. Now he wanted to ask if Ratnasuri would go with her, Srimala, to India to conduct the first ordinations of Indian women along with Padmasuri, who was living there. Ratnasuri was startled, but she couldn’t mention it to anyone. A retreatant commented to her, “Something happened to you on that retreat!” and she thought, “If only you knew!” Having never been to India before she was scared by the prospect and wondered how she would cope with speaking in front of so many people. But she told herself, “I get nervous speaking in front of five people, what difference does it make if there’s five hundred?” So, aged sixty-four, she went to India to conduct the public ordinations of Jnanasuri and Vimalasuri. As an anagarika, she wore her orange robes for the ceremony, which would have been a powerful visual symbol about women’s spiritual potential for the Indian community.

The ordinations of the women in India were conducted ‘on behalf of’ Sangharakshita. Two years later he asked three senior women Order members to perform ordinations acting now ‘on their own responsibility’ – a very significant development for the Order. Srimala, Sanghadevi and Ratnasuri were the first women private preceptors acting in this way. But it was Ratnasuri who was asked to perform the public ordinations. In summer 1989, on a retreat at Taraloka, she received into the Order Cittaprabha from Sydney. A few weeks later, on 11 September, another six women received their ordinations. These were historic events, not only for the Western Buddhist Order, but for the whole Buddhist world where full ordination of women – a lineage started by the Buddha himself – had long since largely died out. Because Sangharakshita was able to entrust her with this responsibility, and she was willing to take it on, Ratnasuri opened the door for a new ordination lineage of women ordaining women to come into being. She went on to ordain many more women into the Triratna Buddhist Order. As a preceptor she privately and publicly ordained 45 women in total, as well as being a kalyana mitra or friend to countless others.

Ratnasuri was a lover of meditation and as well as living in the community at Taraloka, she took part in many retreats held there. She was frequently the oldest in community situations, but her joie-de-vivre and youthful spirits belied that. During all this time, she maintained her love and inspiration for the arts. She was a poet and a photographer. She loved relaxing to classical music in her reclining chair. And she was a print-maker, making prints from her own woodcuts.As well as her passion for creativity, meditation and friendship, she was a lover of technology and could be seen at the Genius Bar of an Apple Store whenever she got a chance!

At the end of 2005, Ratnasuri had a huge shock. She was celebrating a birthday in the Taraloka community when she had a phone call to say that her son, Peter, had died. His death was a great loss to Ratnasuri. Previously, she had been suffering with anaemia and later confided that had she still been anaemic, the shock might have killed her. Characteristically she responded to old age and anaemia by taking up the Vajrayogini meditation practice because “I needed more blood” and to “let go more”. She could be seen frequently at Order events manifesting the dakini energy on her pedal scooter!

In 2014, she made the decision to leave Taraloka, her home of nearly thirty years, and move into sheltered accommodation in nearby Wrexham. A retreat centre is a busy place to live and, aged ninety-one, she was ready for a quieter, more reflective life. She also relished the idea of shopping and cooking for herself, going about town, having adventures. Unfortunately, her eyesight was deteriorating quite rapidly due to macular degeneration, so she couldn’t be as independent as she would have liked. One of the hardest things about sight loss, she said, was not being able to see the faces of her friends.

In 2019, it became clear that independent living was no longer viable for Ratnasuri, even though her friends, carers and the Taraloka community had helped considerably. With their help, she moved into a residential home in Wrexham with her beloved budgies, who gave her so much joy.

‘Ratna’ means jewel and Ratnasuri was a kind, generous, creative and multi-faceted person. ‘Suri,’ means heroine: she broke down barriers of what it means to be a woman Buddhist in the west and what it means to practise the Dharma in mid to old age.

She leaves behind an Order with a flourishing women’s wing, and a lineage of women’s ordinations that she helped inaugurate. She leaves behind many devoted friends and admirers, and her son Kevin. She will be sadly missed.

Dharmacharini Kamalagita, 17/09/19

LETTER FROM THE CHAIR

 

Ratnadharini’s letter from the November 2019 College Meeting will be posted here soon.